The Gender Gap in Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities

  • Authors: Aric Zion, MS;
  • Peter Juergens, MA;
  • Thomas Hollmann, MBA, PhD

INTRODUCTION

Many charities have an inherent gender difference in brand awareness. In order to provide perspective on how the largest 100 U.S. charities perform with respect to differences in brand awareness by gender, Zion & Zion’s research team analyzed the data from 1,053 respondents to our annual survey to rank Americans’ brand awareness of the 100 largest U.S. charities. Note that the original analysis from our study can be found in this report: Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities, and related studies can be found at Millennials vs. Non: The Generational Divide in Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities, and High Income Consumers’ Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities.

Additional analysis charts below

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GENDER DISPARITIES

Female and male consumers are in strong agreement when it comes to many top ten charities of which they have the highest brand awareness, but there are differences in their respective brand awareness among many well-known charities. Females edge out males for brand awareness of charities such as Save the Children (16% differential), Feed the Children (15%), and March of Dimes (14%)—see Figure 3. Males hold meaningful brand awareness leadership differentials with a number of charities as well: American Civil Liberties Union and Foundation (19%), Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation (18%), and Doctors Without Borders (13%)—see Figure 4.

PUTTING THE DATA TO WORK

It is clear from the data that not all charities experience disparity with respect to differences in brand awareness by gender. However, some clearly do. It is our hope that by highlighting the differences in gender-related brand awareness where differences exist, we bring some market clarity to the situation, thereby enabling charities to take action where appropriate. In particular, while we do believe that each charity may indeed know the composition of its own donor base, the data provided here will highlight gender differences with respect to brand awareness, and not simply with respect to donors.