High Income Consumers’ Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities

INTRODUCTION

Many charities covet those supporters who have higher incomes, concluding that higher income means a greater ability to give. In order to provide perspective on how the largest 100 U.S. charities perform with respect to brand awareness by different consumer income segments, Zion & Zion’s research team analyzed the data from 1,053 respondents to our annual survey to rank American’s brand awareness of the 100 largest U.S. charities. Note that the original analysis from our study can be found in this report: Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities, and related Zion & Zion studies can be found at Millennials vs. Non: The Generational Divide in Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities and The Gender Gap in Brand Awareness Rankings of the 100 Largest U.S. Charities.

Additional analysis charts below

Please scroll to view all data columns.

Charity Name
Brand Awareness Rank
Brand Awareness
<$100K Income Brand Awareness
$100K+ Income Brand Awareness
Income Brand Awareness Differential
Favored Income
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital st-jude 1 91% 88% 98% 10% High Income
Salvation Army salvation 2 88% 86% 91% 5% High Income
Boys & Girls Club of America clubs 3 87% 80% 98% 17% High Income
American Heart Association heart 4 85% 82% 95% 13% High Income
YMCA of the USA ymca 4 85% 83% 91% 8% High Income
American Cancer Society american-cancer 6 84% 79% 91% 12% High Income
Goodwill Industries International oodwill 7 81% 78% 87% 9% High Income
Make-A-Wish Foundation of America make-a-wish 8 80% 79% 84% 5% High Income
American National Red Cross red-cross 9 80% 76% 89% 12% High Income
Habitat for Humanity International habitat 10 78% 74% 85% 11% High Income
Boy Scouts of America boy-scouts 11 77% 72% 90% 18% High Income
Wounded Warrior Project wounded-warrior 12 75% 65% 91% 26% High Income
March of Dimes Foundation march 13 75% 64% 93% 29% High Income
World Wildlife Fund wwf 14 75% 73% 80% 8% High Income
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) aspca 15 72% 65% 83% 18% High Income
Doctors Without Borders USA doctors-without 15 72% 61% 90% 29% High Income
Planned Parenthood Federation of America lanned-parenthood 17 71% 68% 79% 11% High Income
Mayo Clinic mayo 18 70% 64% 82% 19% High Income
Susan G. Komen for the Cure susan-g-komen 19 68% 57% 86% 30% High Income
Humane Society of the United States humane-society 20 68% 67% 70% 3% High Income
Shriners Hospitals for Children shriners 21 66% 60% 77% 17% High Income
United States Fund for UNICEF unicef 22 66% 63% 72% 9% High Income
United Way Worldwide united-way 23 65% 62% 69% 7% High Income
Alzheimer’s Association alzheimers 24 63% 63% 64% 1% High Income
Smithsonian Institution smithsonian 25 60% 52% 79% 26% High Income
Marine Toys for Tots Foundation marine-toys 26 60% 50% 77% 27% High Income
Disabled American Veterans disabled-american 27 59% 55% 67% 12% High Income
Public Broadcasting Service bs 28 58% 44% 80% 36% High Income
Feed the Children feed-the-children 29 57% 50% 79% 29% High Income
Metropolitan Museum of Arts metropolitan-museum 30 56% 51% 68% 17% High Income
Save the Children Federation save-the-children 31 53% 43% 70% 28% High Income
Catholic Charities USA catholic-charities 32 53% 47% 63% 16% High Income
American Civil Liberties Union and Foundation aclu 33 51% 37% 74% 37% High Income
Easterseals easterseals 34 50% 43% 63% 20% High Income
Museum of Modern Art museum-of-modern 35 50% 45% 64% 19% High Income
Catholic Relief Services catholic-relief 36 50% 43% 70% 27% High Income
Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation clinton 37 43% 38% 57% 19% High Income
Rotary Foundation of Rotary International rotary 38 42% 32% 58% 26% High Income
National Multiple Sclerosis Society national-multiple-sclerosis 39 41% 36% 52% 16% High Income
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society leukemia 40 40% 36% 49% 13% High Income
Volunteers of America volunteers 41 39% 40% 37% 3% Low Income
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) uvenile-diabetes 42 38% 35% 43% 8% High Income
Feeding America feeding-america 43 36% 39% 25% 14% Low Income
American Kidney Fund american-kidney 44 36% 34% 38% 4% High Income
Nature Conservancy nature-conservancy 45 35% 26% 51% 25% High Income
Environmental Defense Fund environmental-defense 45 35% 27% 47% 20% High Income
Paralyzed Veterans of America aralyzed-veterans 47 34% 33% 36% 3% High Income
CARE USA care 47 34% 31% 41% 10% High Income
Junior Achievement USA unior-achievement 49 34% 25% 51% 26% High Income
Christian Broadcasting Network cbn 50 31% 31% 34% 3% High Income
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center memorial-sloan 51 31% 27% 41% 14% High Income
Teach for America teach-for-america 52 30% 27% 35% 8% High Income
Mount Sinai Health Systems mount-sinai 53 29% 27% 34% 7% High Income
World Vision world-vision 54 28% 26% 34% 9% High Income
Lutheran Services in America lutheran 55 28% 26% 32% 6% High Income
Children International children-international 56 25% 21% 34% 13% High Income
Helen Keller International helen-keller 57 23% 21% 28% 7% High Income
Smile Train smile-train 58 21% 14% 37% 23% High Income
United Service Organizations united-service 59 21% 17% 27% 11% High Income
New York-Presbyterian Hospital new-york-presbyterian 60 19% 16% 25% 9% High Income
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute dana-farber 61 18% 12% 27% 15% High Income
Food for the Poor food-for-the-poor 62 18% 20% 13% 7% Low Income
Samaritan’s Purse samaritans 63 17% 16% 19% 3% High Income
The Arc the-arc 64 16% 16% 16% 0% Equal
Young Life young-life 65 16% 12% 24% 11% High Income
ChildFund International childfund 66 15% 16% 15% 1% Low Income
Carter Center carter 67 15% 11% 21% 10% High Income
Compassion International compassion 68 13% 13% 14% 2% High Income
Scholarship America scholarshi 69 13% 14% 9% 5% Low Income
Americares Foundation americares 70 12% 13% 10% 3% Low Income
Midwest Food Bank midwest-food 71 12% 12% 11% 1% Low Income
UJA/Federation of New York uja 72 11% 5% 20% 15% High Income
Wycliffe Bible Translators wycliffe 73 10% 12% 5% 7% Low Income
Step Up for Students step-u 74 9% 12% 4% 9% Low Income
PATH ath 75 9% 9% 8% 2% Low Income
Task Force for Global Health task-force 76 9% 9% 9% 0% Equal
Museum of the Bible museum-of-the-bible 77 8% 11% 4% 7% Low Income
Houston Food Bank houston 77 8% 10% 5% 5% Low Income
International Rescue Committee international-rescue 79 8% 8% 9% 1% High Income
American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee american-jewish 80 8% 9% 6% 2% Low Income
Direct Relief direct-relief 81 8% 9% 5% 5% Low Income
Cross International cross 82 6% 9% 1% 8% Low Income
Cru cru 83 6% 5% 9% 4% High Income
Detroit Institute of Arts detroit 83 6% 6% 7% 2% High Income
Catholic Medical Mission Board catholic-medical 83 6% 5% 9% 4% High Income
Operation Blessing International Relief & Development operation 86 6% 6% 7% 2% High Income
Brother’s Brother Foundation brothers 87 6% 7% 4% 3% Low Income
Mathew 25: Ministries matthew 87 6% 6% 5% 1% Low Income
Healthwell Foundation healthwell 89 6% 4% 10% 7% High Income
Patient Access Network Foundation atient-access 90 5% 4% 9% 5% High Income
Educational Media Foundation educational-media 90 5% 5% 5% 0% Equal
Good 360 ood-360 92 5% 5% 5% 0% Equal
Delivering Good deliverin 92 5% 5% 5% 0% Equal
Entertainment Industry Foundation entertainment 94 5% 5% 4% 1% Low Income
CBM (Christian Blind Mission) cbm 95 4% 4% 3% 1% Low Income
Project Orbis International roject-orbis 96 4% 3% 5% 2% High Income
Population Services International opulation 97 4% 3% 5% 2% High Income
Peabody Essex Museum eabody 98 3% 2% 7% 4% High Income
Conservation International Foundation conservation 99 3% 3% 3% 0% Equal
MAP International ma 100 2% 4% 0% 4% Low Income

INCOME CONTRASTS

High earners aren’t in sync with others when it comes to brand awareness of charities. Consumers with incomes <$100K and those earning ≥$100K agree on only six of the top ten charities as to brand awareness (Figures 1 and 2). There are significant differentials where households with annual incomes of <$100K have higher brand awareness than those earning more—the largest is Feeding America, with those making less having an edge of 14% over higher earners (see Figure 3). And there are many charities where higher earners have extreme differentials in brand awareness as compared with lower income consumers. Some examples include American Civil Liberties Union (with a 37% differential), Public Broadcasting Service (36%), and Susan G. Komen for the Cure (30%). See Figure 4.

PUTTING THE DATA TO WORK

It is clear from the data that not all charities suffer from a problem with respect to differences in brand awareness by high income consumers. However, some clearly do. It is our hope that by highlighting the differences in income-related brand awareness where differences exist, we bring some market clarity to the situation, thereby enabling charities to take action where appropriate.